Seth Godin’s This is Marketing: What it Means for Brands

Seth Godin’s new book This is Marketing sums up the lessons of his previous books.

In the past Marketing was Advertising. Many Brands and businesses used to buy ads to interrupt prospects in the hope that people would buy. However, with so many media channels, the advertising of yesterday has lost its effect.

What this means for Marketers is that they need to build trust, engagement, community and earn permission to contact prospects and customers. With the ever-increasing privacy legislation such as GDPR, Marketers will pay a high price for SPAM.

Also, today there are many micro-markets of products and services as opposed to one mass-market. Frequency has surpassed reach in terms of effectiveness. Marketers need to tell a compelling story that resonates with the people they seek to serve.

Marketers need to improve their knowledge of customers to enhance the customer experience and engagement. Brands need to have conversations with customers as opposed to talking at them.

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Ideas that jumped out at me while reading and listening to the book

Seth dissects Marketing, showing the reader that today’s successful marketer is generous and gives value to the customer as opposed to stealing their attention.

Chapter 19, the chapter on funnels is very interesting because it shows how to look at the funnel in a new way.

Seth explains how to shorten the sales cycle by making it easier for prospects to engage and purchase a product.

He demonstrates how to do funnel math to see if and when marketers should advertise using paid ads along with how to know if ads will pay for themselves.

In this chapter, Seth shows how marketers should focus on serving micro-markets as opposed to the mass market.

This idea is illustrated in Jeff Moore’s book Crossing the Chasm. Seth takes this concept, and explains how to move a product from micro-markets to the mass market but surprises the reader by demonstrating that marketers can be successful by catering to a micro-market.

Seth illustrates this in the long tail concept where he shows that hits are exceptions to the rule. Instead he shows that selling a lot of different products to different people is the way that most marketers will find success today and in the future.

What is next in Marketing? Comment and share.

Bonus Content

I have had the pleasure of meeting Seth on two occasions. Here are videos and pictures of the talks.

Key Insights from the World Business Forum

8 Takeaways from Advertising Week 2018

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5 Ways to Optimize Your LinkedIn Profile for Storytelling

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A LinkedIn profile is a great opportunity to show case who you are and what you can do for others.  To effectively show case yourself with your LinkedIn profile, you need to be able to tell a story that is credible and engaging. How do you tell a story on LinkedIn with your profile? There are 5 Steps you need to take in order to optimize your profile for storytelling.

1. Creating a Great Headline

A headline is  equivalent to the title of a book, essay or story. The headline should be engaging. Like a story, the reader decides if they want to read more or move on. This is the Attention Economy. Using the automatic headline that lists your job title is a mistake. It is boring and makes you just like everyone else. It demonstrates that you lack creativity.

Your headline should be a short introduction of how you help others in your current role; if you are happily employed or if you are looking to advance in your current field. People who work at LinkedIn do this effectively. If you are looking to change careers, the title should demonstrate how you can take skills and insights that you have developed and apply them to the career that you aspire to obtain. In other words, the headline should be able to answer the question “What are you looking to do or what do you want in your next role?”  Next, every great book title needs a visual to impact readers.

2 Uploading a Photo

LinkedIn profiles includes large amounts of text. Similar to a story, text alone is not visually appealing. This is where a photo can help. When you upload a photo to your LinkedIn profile, your profile comes to life; similar to cover art on the front cover of an autobiography. Remember your profile is your story & brief  career autobiography.

When you chose a picture, make sure that it is clear and makes you look professional. Get a professional head-shot if need be. LinkedIn is offering a Picture Opportunity across the United states where users can obtain a fresh professional head-shot along with profile optimization advice. I am using the picture that I received from the event in New York City.

3.Crafting and Creating a Summary/Presentation

Your summary should reflect and expand on the headline. This is the place where you provide a brief overview that supports your headline, thesis and title of your story. Your summary can be used to briefly introduce yourself to your audience. It is important to keep your audience in mind. Put yourself in the place of the reader. Would want to read your profile if the roles were reversed? If the answer is no then make it better! Ask for help if need be.

Once you introduce yourself, tell your story. Explain your background , where you are today and where you want to be in the future. Make sure to include how your current skill set and experience has helped others and how these skills can be applied to a new role. When you list your work experience, make sure to back up your headline and summary. Think of this as your body paragraphs.

4. Describing your work experience

As I mentioned above, the work experience section of your profile are the body paragraphs of your essay and story. It should be listed in chronological order. Each position that you describe should have specific examples of how you helped others in the role. LinkedIn also allows users to upload presentations and videos of their work. This can serve as a digital portfolio of your work that people can view. The next thing that I would do is to obtain recommendations. You can also share your presentations from Slideshare on LinkedIn as well.

5.  Obtaining Recommendations and Endorsements

A LinkedIn recommendation serves as proof that you have done excellent work in your position. These recommendations should be from coworkers, supervisors and customers that you have served. They should serve as the conclusion to your story and essay where your claims are verified and validated. Recommendations should not be given away freely; doing that will undermine your credibility.

Endorsements are a quick way for someone to say that you are good at a particular skill with out needing to write a recommendation. LinkedIn allows users to list up to 50 skills that connections can endorse.

Putting it all Together

Using these 5 steps will allow you to create a LinkedIn profile that can help you tell a credible and engaging story to potential customers and employers.

How have you used your LinkedIn profile to tell your story?

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